Equipment Manufacturers Urge Lawmakers to Reclaim US Infrastructure Advantage

Fix US Infrastructure to Be Competitive, Say Equipment Manufacturers

"The United States once had an infrastructure system that was the envy of the world,” says Dennis Slater, president of the AEM. But these days, not so much.

In order to retain the United States’ position as the world’s strongest economy, the Association of Equipment Manufactures believes that is is essential to modernize and rebuild America’s core infrastructure network.

In a report released this week, "The U.S. Infrastructure Advantage," the group outlines steps lawmakers should take to reclaim the country's infrastructure advantage.

The report makes the case for a U.S. infrastructure system that supports the safe and efficient movement of people and goods; provides connectivity between and within rural and urban America; and fosters strong economic growth and robust job creation.

"The United States once had an infrastructure system that was the envy of the world,” said Dennis Slater, AEM President. “Our infrastructure competitiveness and our economic competitiveness are linked. This set of policy recommendations to reclaim our infrastructure advantage speak to that connection and outline what government officials should be thinking about as they consider future legislation.”

The group offers five key steps that policymakers and infrastructure stakeholders can take:

1. Focus on networks and systems
2. Maximize use of smart technology
3. Ensure rural-urban connectivity
4. Expedite project delivery
5. Provide adequate and reliable resources

The report also provides firsthand perspectives from equipment manufacturers about the importance of infrastructure to the United States' economy.

“Equipment manufacturers have an important role to play in reclaiming the U.S. infrastructure advantage," added Slater. "Equipment manufacturers depend on an efficient infrastructure system - directly in their day-to-day operations, as well as indirectly to sustain the economic health of other sectors that rely on our industry,” added Slater. “They also make the equipment that builds and supports U.S. infrastructure construction and operation.”

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