Warehouse worker

Yet More Advice on How to Manage Millennials in Warehouse

A recent industry conference discussion concludes that millennials prioritize their time above all else.

A discussion on management wouldn’t be complete if the topic of how to manage one particular segment -- millennials – wasn’t included. At a session at WERC 2018, currently underway in Charlotte, N.C. , Kathy Daugherty, materials manager at Ingersoll Rand moderated a panel that offered advice based on their experiences with this group.

As reported by Julie Bernhard of MultiBriefts, the group attending the session settled in on three key things they found to work for the warehouse members specifically:

Segmentation of Roles

The group concluded that while all warehouse roles don’t really evolve unless they hit a supervisorial level, that doesn’t mean you can’t create your own internal ladder. Some groups offer different warehouse levels, all set with varying objectives and pay structures.

For example, they can begin at Warehouse Specialist 1, and work their way up to 4 — or however many necessary, to keep employees engaged.

Flexible Hours/incentives

Millennials prioritize their time above all else. Offering them other opportunities to build a work schedule that works for them — rather than just for you — can pay dividends.

One organization moved to having warehouse employees come in for longer shifts, three days a week. They found that having four days off gave more reason for employees to hit all their shifts.

Continued Transparency and Technical Feedback

Finally, millennials need to know they are part of the plan and have a seat at the table. Having closed-door meetings or making structural changes without it being clearly communicated will cause them to check out.

They shouldn’t think the only reason their manager ever speaks to them is that they did something wrong. Communicate with them regularly — whether it be about work or how their mom is doing. They believe in being people first.

 Click here for full article on MultiBriefs

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