Super Truck II Program DOE

SuperTruck II Program Aims to Improve Efficiency

The goal for the SuperTruck program include the demonstration of greater than 100% improvement in freight efficiency over 2009 equivalent product, and a 55% engine increase in brake thermal efficiency performance.

The $8 million SuperTruck II program funded by the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) just got some new partners. Kenworth announced last week that it is developing advancements in Class 8 truck aerodynamics, engine and powertrain efficiencies for this program. 

The goal for the SuperTruck program include the demonstration of greater than 100% improvement in freight efficiency over 2009 equivalent product, and a 55% engine increase in brake thermal efficiency performance.

 According to the DOE, trucks haul 80% of goods in the United States and use about 28 billion gallons of fuel per year. This accounts for approximately 22% of total transportation energy usage and presents a significant opportunity to increase efficiency and reduce cost for a key segment of the nation's transportation sector.

Both Kenworth and UPS will be involved in the program. The project will utilize the flagship on-highway Kenworth T680 tractor and an industry leading PACCAR MX engine. And UPS will provide guidance on their drive and duty cycles to drive SuperTruck II performance. It will also offer advice on the commercial feasibility and driver acceptance of technologies developed under SuperTruck II.

PACCAR joins four other SuperTruck II teams working to develop such innovative technologies designed to more than double the freight efficiency of Class 8 trucks. Up to $12 million in additional funding could be awarded for the Kenworth T680 and PACCAR MX engine project over the next three years, subject to annual appropriations by Congress, which has been very supportive of the SuperTruck II initiative. Kenworth also is working closely with the PACCAR Technical Center and DAF Trucks NV, a subsidiary of PACCAR, Eaton, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Mississippi State University, and AVL

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