Sustainability in the News Copyright UIG via Getty Images

Sustainability in the News

According to PERC President and CEO Roy Willis, the change also emphasizes recent investments by the propane industry in new technologies. “Increasing domestic demand for propane in the U.S. will ultimately lead to cleaner air and increased use of our nation's own energy resources, rather than relying on foreign oil,” he says.

  • The Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) launched a new logo and brand identity for propane, PROPANE Clean American Energy™. The logo, anchored by the image of an American bald eagle, highlights propane as an increasingly American-made alternative fuel at a time when U.S. propane production from natural gas liquids is at record levels. According to PERC President and CEO Roy Willis, the change also emphasizes recent investments by the propane industry in new technologies. “Increasing domestic demand for propane in the U.S. will ultimately lead to cleaner air and increased use of our nation's own energy resources, rather than relying on foreign oil,” he says.
  • Green Marine and the Association of Canadian Port Authorities (ACPA) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to try reducing the marine industry’s environmental footprint and encourage the industry to continuously improve its environmental performance. The MoU was signed earlier this summer during Green Marine’s annual conference, GreenTech 2014, in Saint John New Brunswick. The agreement will serve as a framework for the advancement of the Green Marine Environmental Program and increased collaboration on related initiatives. Green Marine is a voluntary marine industry initiative with the goal of achieving levels of environmental performance that exceed regulatory requirements in areas such as air/land/water emissions. There are currently more than 80 ship owners, port authorities, terminals and shipyards from coast to coast, in Canada and the United States, participating in the program.
  • Panama Canal Administrator Jorge L. Quijano recently received a Maersk Line delegation led by Søren Skou, CEO of Maersk Liner Business, to provide an update on the Expansion Program and discuss trends in the maritime industry. Environmental responsibility was a key part of the discussion. Quijano noted that the Canal’s shortcut has reduced the maritime carbon footprint for a century, beginning long before pollution and global climate change became an issue. For Maersk, which improved its vessel design and operating procedures to obtain substantial reductions in fuel consumption, Panama’s route has further reduces its fuel consumption, Skou noted. The expectation is that the expanded Canal will permit bigger vessels through the waterway, allowing for more efficient connectivity and savings through economies of scale.

 

 

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